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Webcast on Accelerated Education

June 9, 2016 @ 9:00 am - 10:00 am

Webcast

USAID ECCN, in partnership with the Inter-Agency Accelerated Education Working Group (AEWG),  hosted a webcast on June 9, offering a first preview of the AEWG’s Accelerated Education pocket guide, which features 10 key principles of Accelerated Education. Presenters covered the development, importance, and potential application of the Accelerated Education pocket guide and an overview of the 10 principles to guide development and implementation of Accelerated Education programming.

Join the Q&A

AEWG Resources

Please note that the pocket guide is a beta version and is being field tested. Please contact Martha Hewison (HEWISON@unhcr.org) for further information, or if you are interested in taking part in the field test.

AEWG Guide to the Principles (English)
AEWG Guide to the Principles (French)

AEWG Accelerated Education Definitions (English)
AEWG Accelerated Education Definitions (French)

Accelerated Education Principles: 10 Principles for Effective Practice (English)
Accelerated Education Principles: 10 Principles for Effective Practice (French)

AEWG ECCN Webcast Presentation

What is the Accelerated Education Working Group and what does it do?

Webcast Presenters

Martha Hewison has over 20 years of education experience working for INGOs, donors, and governments in East, West, and Southern Africa, with a particular focus on education in post-conflict contexts and fragile states. Currently she is part of the UNHCR Education team, with a specific focus on supporting accelerated education programmes, and is chair of the AEWG. Prior to this, she has worked largely in East Africa (Uganda, South Sudan, Somalia, and Kenya) with a specific focus on education and fragility.

Kate Radford, with War Child, has over 20 years’ experience working internationally in rights-based development cooperation, change management, programme management and evaluation and business development in the development, humanitarian, and private sectors

James Lawrie, Senior Education Adviser with Save the Children, has 15 years’ experience as a teacher, researcher, policy adviser, and programme manager working in numerous conflict, post-conflict, and low-income locations. He has been involved in Accelerated Education Programming in South Sudan, DRC, Bangladesh, and Uganda, and joined the AEWG in 2015.

Webcast Facilitator

Ash Hartwell has 40 years of field experience working at community, national and international levels on educational policy analysis, planning, evaluation, and research. He has conducted program and project evaluations in numerous crisis and post-conflict countries including Uganda, Egypt, and South Sudan. Over the past five years he completed numerous consultancies including serving on the core Leader Team for EQUIP 2, focusing on an analysis of alternative education models for underserved populations. Mr. Hartwell is M&E Specialist for USAID ECCN, Adjunct Professor at the Center for International Education at the University of Massachusetts, and joined the AEWG in 2015.

AEWG Webcast Questions and Answers

Brenda Bell: What definition of “accelerated” are you using? And where will you give that definition? Often “accelerated” is understood to be merely “fast-paced” rather than using accelerated learning principles that lead to deeper, more meaningful learning.
Jim Rogan: What research supports the good practices of the 10 principles?
Sarah Press: When selecting 'relevant' language and standards for the education of refugees outside their home country, do we always assume that home-country language and standards are the most 'relevant'? How do we ensure that refugee education aligns with home-country standards?
Stephen Richardson: How does the AEWG plan to advocate with ministries of education to accept/adopt said principles in the near future? If so, how can the larger AE community be aware of the progress with said ministries?
Tracy: How should AEP be financed and sustained?
Carl Triplehorn: Is there a Do No Harm philosophy in the principles? Often there is a tension between Accelerated Education and formal schooling, as trained teachers are attracted to Accelerated Education Programs due to regular pay and resources, or they take both jobs and are overworked.
Andreas: How are the 10 principles aligned with the INEE Minimum Standards?
Jeanne Moulton: How do you avoid duplicating and/or drawing resources away from the formal system?
Carl Triplehorn: Does the AEP research draw upon the alternate diploma programs in developed countries, such as the GED test in the United States? This would help to demystify what AEP is and how it fits into many education systems.
7 comments on “Webcast on Accelerated Education
  1. Its always difficult having multiple ministry’s supporting one programme. My only suggestion is to encourage and foster close collaboration and coordination- potentially setting up an AEP working group with representatives from both ministries.  In the initial design of the AEP if you know that it is under more than one ministry ensure that both are there and involved in the design and attempt to encourage splitting of responsibilities and developing some kind of joint MoU for the AEP.

  2. Profile photo of USAID ECCN USAID ECCN says:

    Comment from Zillur:

    I am curious about the struggle learners in the classroom. Is there any way to help them? Also I am interested to know about sustainability of the AEP program.

    • AEP learners struggle for a variety of reasons but one  reason is that because they have missed out on parts of their education or indeed never been to school they lack the foundations, the basics. In the 10 AE Principles under P1 ‘AEP is flexible for older learners’ we recommend age-appropriate introductory level course for learners who have never been to school to improve readiness skills. We also mention it again under P4 ‘Prioritize the acquisition of literacy and numeracy skills as the foundation for learning’.

      We also stress the importance of flexibility of class time, and location, as required by the community, teacher, and above all, the specific needs of both male and female learners in order to ensure consistent attendance and completion.  Under P4 we talk about the curriculum being age appropriate and using a relevant language of instruction too and under P7 the involvement and support of the local community. Under P8 we  talk about the learning environment being safe, inclusive and leaning ready. So there are several ways we can help and support learners in the classroom which we have included under the principles.

      We also mention the importance of sustainability under P10 ensuring that goals, monitoring and funding align and that an exit strategy and sustainability plan is included in the design. As mentioned above we talk about using local teachers and having the support of the local community (P9) which all support sustainability.

  3. Profile photo of USAID ECCN USAID ECCN says:

    Comment from Jim Rogan:

    And speaking of Do No Harm–are there any steps or measures in the guide to help ensure AEPs are conflict sensitive?

    • There are steps and measures in the guide under the principles to help ensure AEPs are conflict sensitive; for example under P4 ‘Curriculum, materials and pedagogy are genuinely accelerated, AE-suitable and use relevant language of instruction’  we mention the importance of language relevancy; under P6 ‘Educators are recruited, supervised and remunerated’ we talk about recruiting educators from target geographic areas, building on learner’s culture, language and experience and under P7 ‘AE Centre is effectively managed’ we mention that the  centre management committee (e.g. PTA), should be representative of the community but we do not overtly mention AEP’s should be conflict sensitive and have specific measures in to ensure this. Because of the contexts that AEP’s operate in I think we should add this into final version of the pocket guide.

  4. Profile photo of USAID ECCN USAID ECCN says:

    Comment from Yolande:

    In the DRC (kivus) , the MOE and the ministry of social affairs are both supporting the ALPs  and have problems coordinating of course. The advantage of having the Ministry of social affairs manage the ALP is that they bring more health messaging and practices and safety environments. Any suggestion?

    • Its always difficult having multiple ministry’s supporting one programme. My only suggestion is to encourage and foster close collaboration and coordination- potentially setting up an AEP working group with representatives from both ministries.  In the initial design of the AEP if you know that it is under more than one ministry ensure that both are there and involved in the design and attempt to encourage splitting of responsibilities and developing some kind of joint MoU for the AEP.

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