USAID has released the new Education in Crisis and Conflict Learning Agenda. The agenda is comprised of five priority questions  in the education in crisis and conflict field and was informed by extensive consultations with USAID colleagues and outside experts.

The five areas of research are:

  • humanitarian and development coherence,
  • student well-being,
  • equity,
  • data monitoring and evaluation, and
  • strengthening institutional capacity

To address the research questions posed in the learning agenda, the USAID Education office, supported by ECCN, will organize and disseminate existing data, generate new evidence, and produce conclusions and recommendations through academic research, situational analyses, literature reviews, case studies, peer to peer learning, program and impact evaluations and multi-method tests of the theory of change that guides EICC programming.

Throughout 2018, the USAID EICC team will focus on collaborating with USAID Mission staff and partners to move forward learning activities related to these questions, with the goal of developing learning products that are utilized by staff and partners in program design, implementation and strategic planning processes. Taken as a whole, this new wave of inquiry aims to improve the quality and impact of USAID education programs and technical assistance as well as enhance the shared understanding of what works to improve education in crisis and conflict contexts.

ECCN encourages those who might be doing work that address any areas of this learning agenda to get in touch by sending an email to usaideccn@edc.org subject line: Learning Agenda.

We hope this agenda can result in a collective effort to generate learning that can benefit us all.

Recent News Items

ECCN Invites Pilot Testers and Collaborators

Three unique opportunities for ECCN members interested in piloting new tools or becoming a collaborator:

(A) ECCN is looking for partners to pilot its innovative Safer Learning Environments (SLE) Quantitative Assessment Toolkit, which helps identify the most significant risks to safer learning. ECCN will provide in-country training and (virtual) technical assistance from ECCN’s Research Manager Gwen Heaner. If you have any questions or would like to pilot the toolkit, please email Gwen Heaner. For more information about the qualitative toolkit, which compliments the quantitative one, click here.

(B) If you are knowledgeable about Conflict Sensitive Education or improved monitoring of EiCC programs, ECCN welcomes your input on its draft list of Conflict Sensitive Education Indicators as well as the draft of the ECCN/Education Equity Research Initiative for Access and Retention: Guidance for Practitioners in Crisis and Conflict-Affected Contexts. Please contact ECCN’s Protocols and Metrics Specialist Daniel Lavan.

(C) Partner with ECCN to disseminate your work! If you are working on a new tool or resource or are looking to field-test or publicize research you are conducting in the next twelve months, ECCN invites you to submit an application for its Partner Initiatives by August 10, 2018.

CoP Helps Shape U.S. Education Strategy

As part of the Reinforcing Education Accountability in Development (READ) Act, the U.S. Government will release a new comprehensive education strategy in September. Many agencies, including USAID, have helped to develop this strategy and sought input from the community and public. ECCN itself hosted several consultations through which its members provided input from an Education in Crisis and Conflict perspective.

In May, ECCN members were surveyed about their goals and the challenges they face in their work to foster high-level education for children and youth living in crisis-affected contexts.

In June, ECCN and its partners hosted the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Roundtable. One hundred researchers, practitioners, and policymakers gathered to discuss the current evidence, implementation challenges, promising approaches, and innovative SEL interventions. The gathering informed and helped develop recommendations on social-emotional learning in crisis and conflict-affected contexts for the new U.S. international basic education strategy. Roundtable resources, notes, and slides can be found on the ECCN SEL Event Page.

Access the consolidated input ECCN submitted to USAID  here – thank you all for your input!

 

Help Shape the USG’s new International Basic Ed Strategy

Julie Cram, USAID’s Senior Coordinator of US International Basic Education Assistance, spoke with the ECCN Steering Group to gather views about what the U.S. Government’s priorities should be for the international basic education strategy, particularly from the perspective of education in crisis and conflict. Now, Julie Cram and her team are eager to gather input from the ECCN community.

We invite you to share your views. In particular we encourage members to be as specific as possible, and give examples to illustrate your input.

  1. What are the high-level education outcomes that are most important for children and youth living in crisis-affected contexts?
  2. If the US government were to focus its investments on those outcomes, what medium-term outcomes should we invest in?
  3. What are the two biggest challenges you face in trying to achieve those educational outcomes for children and young people?
  4. Finally, across the US government, what opportunities exist to leverage various agencies’ comparative strengths for improved education outcomes in crisis and conflict regions?

Submit your contributions anonymously or under a name and/or organization by May 13, 2018.

ECCN will compile all the input and share it with Julie Cram’s team.

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